Recent Changes

Wednesday, February 1

Monday, January 30

  1. page Morrison Furniture Building edited The five-story Morrison Furniture block was constructed in 1905 for W.H. Vanburen, a Watertown fur…
    The five-story Morrison Furniture block was constructed in 1905 for W.H. Vanburen, a Watertown furniture dealer.
    Vanburen, a native of Antwerp, N.Y., came to Watertown in 1895 and operated a small furniture store at 104 Court St. As his business continued to expand, Vanburen changed locations, first to a store on Factory Street, then to an old church which had been built in 1828, and had in succession, served as the first home of the congregations of the present First Baptist, St Patrick's and Sacred Heart churches, as well as the Free Methodists. The old church was located also on Factory Street, near the present Morrison building.

    Situated at 230-240 Factory street, constructed entirely of hard glazed brick with heavy stone foundations placed on solid rock. All window ledges and corner stones are of high grade hand cut stones; all floors are supported by heavy steel girders. Steel ceilings throughout the entire building.
    Facing the building: Entrance to the show room at right-hand side; driveway on the left-hand side; at the rear end of the driveway is situated a five-ton electric elevator, built especially for automobile work. This elevator can be regulated to travel seventy-five feet per minute and ascends with the heaviest automobile to any desired floor without any effort. The building is absolutely fire-proof.
    (view changes)
    6:15 pm
  2. page Morrison Furniture Building edited The five-story Morrison Furniture block was constructed in 1905 for W.H. Vanburen, a Watertown fur…
    The five-story Morrison Furniture block was constructed in 1905 for W.H. Vanburen, a Watertown furniture dealer.
    Vanburen, a native of Antwerp, N.Y., came to Watertown in 1895 and operated a small furniture store at 104 Court St. As his business continued to expand, Vanburen changed locations, first to a store on Factory Street, then to an old church which had been built in 1828, and had in succession, served as the first home of the congregations of the present First Baptist, St Patrick's and Sacred Heart churches, as well as the Free Methodists. The old church was located also on Factory Street, near the present Morrison building.

    Situated at 230-240 Factory street, constructed entirely of hard glazed brick with heavy stone foundations placed on solid rock. All window ledges and corner stones are of high grade hand cut stones; all floors are supported by heavy steel girders. Steel ceilings throughout the entire building.
    Facing the building: Entrance to the show room at right-hand side; driveway on the left-hand side; at the rear end of the driveway is situated a five-ton electric elevator, built especially for automobile work. This elevator can be regulated to travel seventy-five feet per minute and ascends with the heaviest automobile to any desired floor without any effort. The building is absolutely fire-proof.
    (view changes)
    5:33 pm

Sunday, January 29

  1. page Old Watertown Street Names edited ... Wall St. Ran from Moulton Street to Front Street ... were duplicates. Academy St. and Aca…
    ...
    Wall St.
    Ran from Moulton Street to Front Street
    ...
    were duplicates. Academy St. and Academy Pl., Clinton St. and Clinton Ave., East Street
    ...
    and their rejected replacements are:
    Academy Place to School Place
    Boyd Place to Burnette Place
    (view changes)
    8:46 pm
  2. page Old Watertown Street Names edited ... Wall St. Ran from Moulton Street to Front Street ... the thoroughfare." In 1925, …
    ...
    Wall St.
    Ran from Moulton Street to Front Street
    ...
    the thoroughfare."
    In 1925, the Watertown Chamber of Commerce proposed changing the names of a great number of city streets. Their arguments were that duplicate and similar sounding street names caused confusion for deliverymen and postal carriers, and also caused delays fire department response The changes were, for the most part, rejected. The street names and their replacements are:
    Academy Place to School Place
    (view changes)
    8:39 pm
  3. page Old Watertown Street Names edited ... Wall St. Ran from Moulton Street to Front Street In 1912, the City Council ordered the Boar…
    ...
    Wall St.
    Ran from Moulton Street to Front Street
    In 1912, the City Council ordered the Board of Public Works to cease duplicating the names of streets by the substitution, for instance of "avenue" for "street." It further suggested that new names be chosen for those streets that already were duplicates. East Street and East Avenue; Mead Street and Mead Ave.; Park St., Park Ave. and Park Place; Pearl St. and Pearl Ave., and also suggested that continuous streets bearing different names, such as Benedict St., Trinity Place and Sherman street should be avoided, with 'one [name] sufficing for the thoroughfare."
    In 1925, the Watertown Chamber of Commerce proposed changing the names of a great number of city streets. Their arguments were that duplicate and similar sounding street names caused confusion for deliverymen and postal carriers, and also caused delays fire department response The changes were, for the most part, rejected. The street names and their replacements are:
    Academy Place to School Place
    Boyd Place to Burnette Place
    Central Avenue to Spring Street or Coolidge Avenue
    Clinton Avenue to Diamond Street or James Street
    Dewey Avenue to Manila Street or Genesee Avenue
    East Street to Eagle Street
    Emerson Place to Wilson Place or Carson Street
    Flower Street to Dale Street
    Glenn Avenue to Cherry Street
    Haney Street to Bundy Street
    Lawrence Avenue to Beech Street
    Main Avenue to West Moulton Street or Wise Avenue
    Massey Avenue to Harding Street
    Meade Avenue to Kelsey Avenue
    Park Avenue to Roosevelt Street
    Park Place to Herald Place or Post Office Place
    Park Street to McKinley Street or Roosevelt Avenue
    Pearl Avenue to Adams Street or Pinnacle Avenue or Tower Avenue
    Prospect Avenue to Hill Street or Hill Road
    Smith Avenue to Garden Street or Oneida Street
    State Place to Oneida Street or Euclid Avenue
    State Street to Globe Street or Bell Street or Page Street
    Sterling Place to Church Place
    Thompson Avenue to Walnut Street
    Washington Avenue to Vista Street

    See Also
    Watertown
    (view changes)
    8:37 pm

Thursday, January 26

  1. page Old Watertown Street Names edited ... Wilson Street From State to Academy Street. Renamed in 1900. Academy to the park added in 191…
    ...
    Wilson Street
    From State to Academy Street. Renamed in 1900. Academy to the park added in 1910.
    [? walkway]Marshall Place
    Jackson St.
    Between Court and [railroad tracks]. "Restricted to pedestrian traffic - Court St. for 156' Northeasterly - Res. 6/7/1971" BETWEEN GLOBE STORE and LIBERTY PLAZA
    (view changes)
    6:39 pm

Sunday, January 22

  1. page Morrison Furniture Building edited Situated at 230-240 Factory street, constructed entirely of hard glazed brick with heavy stone fou…
    Situated at 230-240 Factory street, constructed entirely of hard glazed brick with heavy stone foundations placed on solid rock. All window ledges and corner stones are of high grade hand cut stones; all floors are supported by heavy steel girders. Steel ceilings throughout the entire building.
    Facing the building: Entrance to the show room at right-hand side; driveway on the left-hand side; at the rear end of the driveway is situated a five-ton electric elevator, built especially for automobile work. This elevator can be regulated to travel seventy-five feet per minute and ascends with the heaviest automobile to any desired floor without any effort. The building is absolutely fire-proof.

    (view changes)
    5:11 pm

More